3rd November 2013

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Homemade 7’ alaia, crafted from Douglas fir, with a power planer and gorilla glue. It paddles easier than I thought, duck dives really well, but I sit up to my neck in the water, and caught 0 waves my first time out…

Homemade 7’ alaia, crafted from Douglas fir, with a power planer and gorilla glue. It paddles easier than I thought, duck dives really well, but I sit up to my neck in the water, and caught 0 waves my first time out…

26th May 2011

Photo

Google maps can really provide alot of insight to your local surf break. I included a snapshot of the break near my office, up in Cardiff-by-the-sea, where kooks like me can catch a couple waves in the setting sun after a long day clacking at the keyboard and wrangling bytes.
Notice the three peaks I circled, where conveniently a very summer-like crowd of surfers are loitering, corresponds very nicely with the underwater reefs where the incoming waves react to the underlying bathymetry and form nice breaking reef breaks, and thus very nice surf-able waves. I put in some arrows to indicate the typical path from personal experience that I see the waves breaking. More interestingly, I can directly relate the wave behaviour i have seen to the shape of these reefs, especially when considering the tide height, wave period and amplitude.

Basically, the waves will peak and react to the reefs differently, due to snell’s law, when they hit the underwater terrain, and shape up into nice long breaking waves.
Yup, pretty awesome.

Google maps can really provide alot of insight to your local surf break. I included a snapshot of the break near my office, up in Cardiff-by-the-sea, where kooks like me can catch a couple waves in the setting sun after a long day clacking at the keyboard and wrangling bytes.

Notice the three peaks I circled, where conveniently a very summer-like crowd of surfers are loitering, corresponds very nicely with the underwater reefs where the incoming waves react to the underlying bathymetry and form nice breaking reef breaks, and thus very nice surf-able waves. I put in some arrows to indicate the typical path from personal experience that I see the waves breaking. More interestingly, I can directly relate the wave behaviour i have seen to the shape of these reefs, especially when considering the tide height, wave period and amplitude.

Basically, the waves will peak and react to the reefs differently, due to snell’s law, when they hit the underwater terrain, and shape up into nice long breaking waves.

Yup, pretty awesome.

21st January 2011

Link

Name research →

Curious about the frequency of different first names over the last century (wink wink), I scraped the US Census website (http://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/) to build a database of all names, and their popularity since 1880. I then took a list of names I was curious about, and graphed their position (higher is more popular) over the last century or so, and generated a PDF with matplotlib.

Note that the x-axis (year) is not normalized at this point so may not be the same. Also note the blue and pink lines reflect boys and girls getting these names (which is a bit surprising in some instances, and no this data is not from Australia).

12th January 2011

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Our house was tented when we bought it, but to our surprise we found some debris that looked like termite frass. The pest company came, and the inspector assured us it wasn’t termite droppings, and encouraged us to look at it under a microscope to see the difference. Luckily we had a USB microscope, so we did. Notice the hard, smooth edged pellets; that is the termite droppings. The crumbly kernels are whatever the heck we had on our floor. Interesting….

Our house was tented when we bought it, but to our surprise we found some debris that looked like termite frass. The pest company came, and the inspector assured us it wasn’t termite droppings, and encouraged us to look at it under a microscope to see the difference. Luckily we had a USB microscope, so we did. Notice the hard, smooth edged pellets; that is the termite droppings. The crumbly kernels are whatever the heck we had on our floor. Interesting….

6th July 2010

Link

processing audio fun →

a little fun audio toy i cooked up while playing with the minim library for processing.

30th May 2010

Photo

We have been looking at some houses, and we wanted to get an idea of what the noise would be like. This evening (sunday before memorial day) we went out at about 10pm and i did a 30 second recording on my phone of the noise in front and back (or in one case just on the street). We ran our current residence as a control (1805).
I took all the 3gp files and (after converting to wav with “ffmpeg -i input.3gp output.wav”), extracted a frequency analysis with Audacity (analyze->plot spectrum), and then saved these to text, which is just a tab separated file. Then, using matplotlib and python i quickly pumped out a comparison graph:
from pylab import *

from os import listdir



names=[]

for f in listdir("."):

    if f[-3:]=="txt":

        name=f[:-4]

        names.append(name)

        v=[r.split('\t') for r in open(f).read().split('\n')]

        freq=[i[0] for i in v[1:] if len(i)==2]

        lev=[i[1] for i in v[1:] if len(i)==2]

        plot(freq,lev,label=name)



xlabel("Frequency (Hz)")

ylabel("Level (dB)")

legend(names)

show()


What is interesting is how the front and back for 4775 is so strikingly different. 1805 is our baseline, where we currently live. Talmadge is the nice quiet neighborhood we like.

We have been looking at some houses, and we wanted to get an idea of what the noise would be like. This evening (sunday before memorial day) we went out at about 10pm and i did a 30 second recording on my phone of the noise in front and back (or in one case just on the street). We ran our current residence as a control (1805).

I took all the 3gp files and (after converting to wav with “ffmpeg -i input.3gp output.wav”), extracted a frequency analysis with Audacity (analyze->plot spectrum), and then saved these to text, which is just a tab separated file. Then, using matplotlib and python i quickly pumped out a comparison graph:

from pylab import *

from os import listdir



names=[]

for f in listdir("."):

    if f[-3:]=="txt":

        name=f[:-4]

        names.append(name)

        v=[r.split('\t') for r in open(f).read().split('\n')]

        freq=[i[0] for i in v[1:] if len(i)==2]

        lev=[i[1] for i in v[1:] if len(i)==2]

        plot(freq,lev,label=name)



xlabel("Frequency (Hz)")

ylabel("Level (dB)")

legend(names)

show()

What is interesting is how the front and back for 4775 is so strikingly different. 1805 is our baseline, where we currently live. Talmadge is the nice quiet neighborhood we like.

11th April 2010

Photo

Another Goldenrod Crab Spider, this time amusingly dangling from a Deadly Night Shade flower. We encountered this toxic micro circumstance nestled under some Manzanita on the Kwaay Paay Peak summit, which so nicely overlooks Santee and its many churches and one creationist museum.
I had previously snapped a picture of a flower only to find a crab spider hiding on it.

Another Goldenrod Crab Spider, this time amusingly dangling from a Deadly Night Shade flower. We encountered this toxic micro circumstance nestled under some Manzanita on the Kwaay Paay Peak summit, which so nicely overlooks Santee and its many churches and one creationist museum.

I had previously snapped a picture of a flower only to find a crab spider hiding on it.

6th April 2010

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The sea of cortez is trying to widen like that tear in the seam of a pair of jeans. Keep getting wobbly here in San Diego.. I just felt that bright red square in the bottom right (the rightmost one.. )
Check out earthquakes in your area at earthquake.usgs.gov.

The sea of cortez is trying to widen like that tear in the seam of a pair of jeans. Keep getting wobbly here in San Diego.. I just felt that bright red square in the bottom right (the rightmost one.. )

Check out earthquakes in your area at earthquake.usgs.gov.

1st April 2010

Photo

i am not sure if this is as funny as i think it might be. i can’t find a good quip to put beneath it.

i am not sure if this is as funny as i think it might be. i can’t find a good quip to put beneath it.

29th March 2010

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Using some amusing instructions, i rigged up a box kite mostly to impress a 2 year old. It flew, albeit sporadically, until the blustery winds started to tear the newspaper.

Using some amusing instructions, i rigged up a box kite mostly to impress a 2 year old. It flew, albeit sporadically, until the blustery winds started to tear the newspaper.